Mad Cow Again

The second case of Mad Cow disease in the US was confirmed last week.

What's interesting is that the USDA covered up this last case for seven months. It seems that the original test on the cow that died had mixed results (one positive and one negative) and that conclusive re-testing didn't take place until just a few weeks ago. Seven months is a long time in my opinion and an indicator that the inspection system isn't working.

Could it be pressure from outside sources to make sure beef exports continue and previous bans due to the first Mad Cow confirmation from countries like Japan and Taiwan were reversed?

Would it surprise you to know that currently the US only tests 1 in 90 cows? Back in 2003 it was 1 in 1,700. Japan tests every cow, European countries test 1 in 4.

I predict this is just the tip of the iceberg. With the manner in which meat is processed in the US, there is little chance of getting clean, disease-free, healthy (as nature intended it to be) meat on regular basis - in my opinion.

For example, did you know that the leftover pieces of a slaughtered cow is ground up and fed back to other cows? Well, it was the case until 1997 when they banned this practice. But they still feed cow remains to chickens and pigs. Dead chicken scraps are fed to cows, dead cow scraps are fed to chickens, dead pig scraps are fed to cows. And all the bacteria, disease, manure that's around gets ground up and fed back into feed as well. This just circulates germs, bacteria and disease. It also makes the strains of viruses more resistant to antibiotics. It's crazy! (but efficient) What happened to letting cows feed on grass?

Now let's take hamburgers for example. Did you know that one hamburger can contain hundreds or even thousands of animals? Dr. Robert Tauxe, Chief of food-borne and diarrheal diseases branch of the CDC in a PBS Frontline interview in 2002 disclosed this strange fact. Years ago, when you got a pound of ground beef, it was usually from one or two cows. Not anymore thanks to efficiency in the meat industry.

And if that isn't interesting enough, it's been estimated that as much as 78% of ground beef contains bacteria spread by fecal matter. This is from a study by the USDA and quoted in many books and articles on the subject.

Cows stand around in manure every day. Have you ever visited a dairy or meat processing plant? In my area of the world outside of Phoenix, Arizona there are dozens of dairies. I drive by them almost daily and live within 5-10 minutes of many. One thing you'll notice (or can't miss) when you drive by is the incredible stench (my daughter usually plugs her nose and points it out - if I hadn't noticed!). The cows are all crowded together, covered in mud and manure eating hay and feed. They don't move around much and never see grass. Next door a farm is being sprayed with pestisides and heavy, diesel trucks are moving dirt as a highway is being built around the corner. Am I getting an appetite for a burger and glass of milk after seeing this?

Some of the material above was inspired by Morgan Spurlock's new book "Don't Eat This Book". Haven't finished it yet, but half-way through, I highly recommend it.

Read the whole mad cow article at Yahoo News.
Read the USDA Mad Cow coverup article at the Organic Consumers Asoociation.

I'm glad I'm a vegan :)

Mark
http://vegandiet.blogspot.com

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Conditioning and the Raw Diet

Posted on May 11th, 2009 in 80-10-10,diet,exercise,lifestyle,raw,raw diet,raw food,raw vegan diet by Vegan Raw Diet Advocate 4 Comments »

One of the benefits of eating a raw vegan diet, meaning a diet of fresh, raw vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds, is the ability to condition your body almost effortlessly.

Why do I say almost effortlessly?

Here's why conditioning your body is quite easy when you remove the obstacles... remove the toxins, processed foods, cooked foods and most unnatural substances from your diet and environment.

You see, when your body doesn't have to continue to struggle with obstructions, meaning the toxins we just mentioned, it can respond much easier to physical activity, and not need much recovery, if any to longer or more frequent activities.

For example, recently I found myself at a new aquatic center near my home. I normally don't swim often since most pools I've been to in the past in the area use a wide array of chlorine chemicals. To my surprise, this new center uses a salt based filtration system so I decided to enjoy the water.

To give you a quick background, the most I've probably swam in a pool throughout my entire life is 2-3 laps continuously without stopping. That's been the extent.

I noticed that there was a requirement for eligibility in order to be able to attend evening 'lap night' and found that you must be able to swim at least 20 laps without stopping. Oh my, 20 laps? Without stopping? Based on the fact that I hadn't swam for more than 2-3 in my entire life, I wasn't sure about 20.

Well, always enjoying a challenge, I decided to see how many laps I could do... without stopping.

30.

I was a little sore for a few minutes, but soon felt normal and energetic. In fact, I felt I could have continued (energy wise) but was getting a little dizzy :).

Now I'm not special, anyone can do this if they remove the obstacles our bodies battle with every day when we eat cooked foods, processed foods, ingest toxins and dangerous chemicals as well as being exposed to toxins in our environment.

On a raw vegan diet your body easily stays conditioned and you won't experience cramps, soreness and have plenty of energy to accomplish anything you want. Run 6 miles? Sure. Go hike a mountain? Of course! Swim 30 laps non-stop? Absolutely.

Just stay active regularly and eat a pure, raw, fresh, low fat, whole food diet of fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.

And this isn't just me, ask any raw vegan athlete and they'll share the same story. I had a friend that could do most any exercise, in most any length of repititions or distance without exhaustion or muscle soreness. He could go on as long as he wanted and enjoyed every minute. Of course this was after he transitioned to a raw vegan lifestyle.

Another benefit to the raw vegan diet.

Peace!

Mark

Related:

Use these two exercises you can do at home, without expensive club memberships or equipment, to stay conditioned, lose weight or tone up.

27 Year Raw Foodist Dr Doug Graham Online Tonight Free

Posted on October 20th, 2008 in 80-10-10,80/10/10,interviews,raw diet,raw vegan diet,Resources,vegan diet,video by Vegan Raw Diet Advocate 1 Comment »

Dr. Doug Graham80-10-10 author, 27 year raw foodist, athlete, coach and raw food expert Dr. Doug Graham will be online tonight for an exclusive one hour audio and video presentation and interview, and available at no cost for the next 24 hours.

200 lbs Lost on the Raw Food Diet

Posted on October 14th, 2008 in 80-10-10,80/10/10,raw diet,raw food,raw food weight loss,raw vegan diet,video,weight loss by Vegan Raw Diet Advocate 3 Comments »

Check out this video of Philip McCluskey on CBS's The Doctors with his testimony of losing 200 pounds over 2 years on the raw food diet. He gives a clear, strong and confident testimonial of how raw foods helped him lose weight.

What’s The Best Raw Food Diet?

Posted on April 28th, 2007 in 80-10-10,80/10/10,diet,raw by Vegan Raw Diet Advocate Comments Off on What’s The Best Raw Food Diet?

Over the last two years of being 100% raw, I've experimented with different varieties of the raw food diet.

You see, there are those that eat a high fat raw diet, a diet high in fruit, a junk food raw diet, lots of dehydrated raw foods as well as a mix.

I've noticed that many switching to a raw food diet first focus on the raw aspect, mainly making raw versions of the foods they now eat cooked. Raw pizzas, burritos, lasagna, spaghetti, crackers, breads, shakes, salads with lots of ingredients, milk... lots of nuts, seeds and more. This is a great first step, getting one used to raw foods. However, it's normally very high in fat and nutritionally unsound for the long term.

Over time, I see that simple foods become more appealing. Mono eating becomes more common... eating just one fruit or vegetable at a time.

My journey was very similar to what I've described here and since the new year, I've made another distinction which I believe is the best choice for me and my health. The 80-10-10 diet conceptualized by Dr. Doug Graham has answered many lingering questions and refined my eating habits. Basically, the concept is to eat raw fruits and vegetables in the following proportions: 80% carbohydrates, 10% protein and 10% fat. And it's the percentage of calories, not in volume or weight (for example, a pound of lettuce has volume, but very few calories). When I started, I analyzed how I'd eaten in the past, thinking it would be pretty close to 80-10-10. Was I surprised to find that I had been getting anywhere from 40-60% of my daily calories from fat! Ahhhh!

You get most of your calories from fruit and lots of greens, mainly at the dinner meal.

After revising my diet and following the suggestions made by Dr. Graham, I believe I've found the best raw food diet... the ultimate raw food diet. The diet that I believe we're made for and can thrive on.

There were many improvements to my health after switching, especially digestion. Many of the true benefits of a natural diet started appearing and I know will continue. Meals are easy and fast to make, delicious and fulfilling.

I'll continue to write on my experiences on 80-10-10 and would love to hear yours!

To your best health!

Mark

P.S. Have you read 'The Garden Diet'? - It's a collection of 12 digital books, including the brand new eBook titled "Forever Young, The Anti-Aging Guide" by Storm and Jinjee Talifero.

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